Checking Out Your Vet

 

Vet Check and Complaints   How do you check out a veterinarian for complaintsÖor complain about your current vet? Try your local Better Business Bureau http://welcome.bbb.org/  Also check out your stateís Veterinary Medical Association or State Licensing Board. Youíll have to dig around a little to find the right web page or phone number, but itís worth the effort.  Find state associations at the American Veterinary Medical Association site: http://www.avma.org/advocacy/state/default.asp and http://www.avma.org/advocacy/state/resources/default.asp  If you can't find information from the vet board, you can file a public records request with the board to request disciplinary records.

 

Sometimes, even if youíve checked out your vet thoroughly, the unimaginable happens. What do you do then?

If you suspect real malpractice, rather than an understandable mistake, donít just simmer in your anger. Help prevent the same thing from happening to someone elseís precious pet.  If the incident included a drug reaction, report it to the FDA at http://www.fda.gov/cvm/adetoc.htm and also the drug manufacturer. To report vaccine reactions on-line, go here: On-line reporting form: https://web01.aphis.usda.gov/CVB/adverseeventreport.nsf/Adverse%20Event%20Report%20Form?OpenForm  You'll need to get a lot of the information from your vet. Do not expect your vet to make the report. Underreporting is commonplace.

If you decide to take further action against your vet, check out the advice at http://www.aldf.org/resources/details.php?id=73  

You may also want to check out your state's veterinary practice act. http://www.animallaw.info/articles/armpusstatevetlaws.htm You may or may not learn something that will help you.

If you sue, donít expect a big judgment. In most states, you get medical bills and your dogís replacement value (usually sale price plus your training costs) and maybe a little cash for your emotional pain. But even though, your dog may get some justice and maybe youíll help make other dogs safer. At least you'll make that vet think twice before repeating his behavior.
 

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