Dry Dog Food: Safely Handling and Storing Kibble

Written by Jan on July 29, 2009 – 12:01 am

j0314409Do you feed your dog or cat dry commercial pet food?  Do you know that there are special ways to handle and store it?  Here’s some excellent advice Chelsea of Hero’s Pets sent me. 

First, keep in mind that your animal companion’s food is just as perishable as your own.

After you purchase your food it is important to remember that, like a loaf of bread, just because it comes in a bag and has an expiration day a year or so long, doesn’t mean it lasts on your home shelf for that long. The expiration is how long the food is good for BEFORE it is opened, while it is still in an oxygen barrier bag. As soon as you open the bag it is exposed to oxygen and begins to degrade. Read more »

Share
Tags: best dry food, bloat, dog, dog food, dog nutrition, dry dog food, kibble, puppy kibble, storage, storing
Posted under Main Content | 4 Comments » | Email This Post

Dog Food: 10 Scary Truths

Written by Jan on July 14, 2009 – 12:01 am

Dog with food bowl 40% of dogs are obese. 46% of dogs and 39% of cats now die of cancer. Heart, kidney and liver disease are epidemic. Like people, dogs are what they eat. Save your dog a lot of suffering, and save yourself a fortune in vet bills, by learning the truth about your dog’s diet. Here are 10 important things you may not know about what your dog is eating:

1)      Commercial dog food is “fast food.

Heavily-processed fast foods (burgers, fries, tacos, etc.) as a big diet component can cause major health problems in people. How can fast foods be good for dogs? Only dog food manufacturers think this nonsense makes sense. Dogs and people share roughly 75% the same genetic makeup, and we have similar nutritional needs. What we’re doing to our own health with processed foods, we’re also doing to our dogs. And it’s happening faster.

2)      People food is good for dogs.

Despite what you’ve heard from friends, vets and pet food manufacturers, wholesome “people food” is good for dogs.  People food is only bad for dog food makers. The same fresh, nutritious foods people eat can offer your dog the nutrition he needs and save you a mountain of vet bills.  It just takes a little education to learn the small differences between human and canine nutritional needs. (Hint: no onions, grapes or raisins. Rinse off rich spices and sauces. Go easy on carbs and avoid wheat and corn.)

3)      Don’t presume the food your vet sells is a superior product.

Veterinarians, like medical doctors, learn relatively little about nutrition in school. Much of what they do learn comes directly from pet food company vets, sales reps, articles, studies, and seminars. Read more »

Share
Tags: corn, dog, dog diet, dog food, dog food labels, dog nutrition, dogs, healthy, healthy dog food, kibble, pet food labels, selecting dog food, what should I feed my dog?
Posted under Dog Food, Main Content | 10 Comments » | Email This Post

Is Your Dog Stressed Out?: Locate and Eliminate Hidden Stressors

Written by Jan on July 7, 2009 – 12:01 am

Ostressedur pets’ lives are too often filled with hidden stresses that challenge their health and longevity.  In addition to common stressors like highly processed commercial food, over-vaccination and over-medication, pets will be healthier and happier if you: 
 
•  Reduce their isolation.  Dogs are pack animals. Leave them alone hour after hour, day after day, and they will mourn their very existence.  This can result in  problems like separation anxiety, incessant barking and destructive behavior, and also in health problems. In fact, insufficient attention may be the biggest stress of all.  

•  Improve water.   Impure or insufficient water is dangerous.   Make sure you take water along with you on long or hot walks. Never let your dog drink sprinkler run-off or out of fountains (which likely contain toxic chemicals).  And if you’re drinking purified water, your pets should be, too. 

•  Get Your Dog Moving.  A fit dog is less prone to injury and has a healthier digestive system and heart.  Did you know that heart disease is a major killer of dogs? Like us, they need sensible exercise to live a long, healthy life. But take it easy. Dogs will do their best to keep up with joggers and cyclists even when they shouldn’t. Don’t ask them to exert themselves strenuously unless they’re in shape.

•  Stay slim.  Chubby dogs aren’t cute. They are health problems waiting to happen. Expect early onset of joint damage, diabetes and major organ disease. Read more »

Share
Tags: dog, dogs, fitness, health care, love, stress
Posted under Main Content | No Comments » | Email This Post

Rabies Vaccine Skin Reaction: Ischemic Dermatopathy

Written by Jan on July 1, 2009 – 12:01 am

See the results rabies-induced Ischemic Dermatopathy on Peaches' haunch and ears

Rabies-vaccine-induced Ischemic Dermatopathy forced the retirement of Peaches from competition. See the disease on her haunch and ears.

Peaches, Judy Schor’s champion agility dog, retired when she developed Ischemic Dermatopathy after a rabies shot. In March, Judy raised $30,000 with her benefit for the Rabies Challenge Fund, a nonprofit trying to prove that the vaccine gives immunity for at least seven years. Fund researcher Dr. Ron Schultz , and co-Founder Dr. Jean Dodds, spoke about the dangers of the rabies vaccine at the benefit. 

Here is how a shot changed Peaches’s life as told by Judy:
 
As a well intentioned and responsible pet owner, I take my pups in for their annual Well checks and Dental’s. And like clockwork, every 3 years, as required by law, my dogs would get their 3 year Rabies vaccine.
 
In early April of 2007, I took my beloved Rat-Terrier Peaches in for her 7 year Rabies booster. We returned home and nothing unusual noted, however in retrospect, maybe I was remiss in noticing any lethargy or changes as I really never thought that a legally required vaccine could/would cause any harm.

Read more »

Share
Tags: adverse reactions, diet, disease, dog, dogs, food, Ischemic Dermatopathy, Peaches, problem, rabbies, rabies shot, Rabies Vaccination, rabies vaccine, rat terrier, side effects, skin, supplements, treatment, vitamins
Posted under Main Content, Rabies Vaccination, Skin Disease, vaccination | 12 Comments » | Email This Post

Changing Rabies Vaccination Laws

Written by Jan on June 25, 2009 – 12:01 am

Kris Christine, Founder of the Rabies Challenge Fund with renowned vaccination expert Dr. Jean Dodds,  is the person most responsible for changing rabies laws from one or two years to three in every state (but not every locale yet).  Brava Kris!  Her passion for this began when her beautiful dog Meadow died from an injection site fibrosarcoma after a rabies shot.

Here is an excerpt from a letter Kris recently sent trying to prevent a change in the law in Muncie, Indiana, from three years to one!  This move is clearly to bring in more revenue with more frequent licensing, as the science in no way supports it.

This letter has valuable information we all should read — especially if you’re living in an area requiring shots more often than the national standard of every three years.

“… recommendations of the American Veterinary Medical Association [1] and the Center for Disease Control’s National Association of State Public Health Veterinarian’s 2008 Compendium of Animal Rabies Prevention and Control advise that: “Vaccines used in state and local rabies control programs should have at least a 3-year duration of immunity…….. No laboratory or epidemiologic data exist to support the annual or biennial administration of 3- or 4-year vaccines following the initial series.”

A regressive ordinance revision requiring annual rabies boosters for dogs and cats is medically unnecessary and scientifically unfounded.  According to the American Animal Hospital Association, “The minimum DOI [duration of immunity] for killed rabies vaccine based on challenge studies is 3 years; based on antibody titers, it is considered to be up to 7 years..” [2] 

More frequent vaccination than is required to fully immunize an animal will not achieve further disease protection.  Redundant annual rabies shots needlessly expose dogs and cats to the risk of adverse effects while obligating residents to pay unnecessary veterinary medical fees, which could violate … consumer protection laws and obligate veterinarians to engage in unprofessional conduct (Code 25-1) by administering medically unwarranted rabies vaccines in order for their clients to comply with the amended ordinance.  The American Veterinary Medical Association’s 2001 Principles of Vaccination state that “Unnecessary stimulation of the immune system does not result in enhanced disease resistance, and may increase the risk of adverse post-vaccination events.”   

It is recognized that most, if not all, currently licensed annual rabies vaccines given annually are actually the 3-year vaccine relabeled for annual use — Read more »

Share
Tags: adverse reactions, aggression, autoimmune disease, how long does the rabies vaccine last, liver, lump, rabbies, rabies, rabies shot, rabies vaccine, seizures, side effects, vaccination, vaccine, vomiting
Posted under Main Content, Rabies Vaccination, vaccination | 4 Comments » | Email This Post