Rabies Vaccine Injection-Site Tumors

Written by Jan on October 28, 2009 – 12:01 am

Zsazsa and her Tumor

Zsazsa and her Injection-Site Tumor

A Chihuahua named Zsazsa developed a large injection-site fibrosarcoma after a rabies shot.  Looking for information, Angel Moran (Zsazsa’s  “mom”) e-mailed Kris Christine, Founder of the Rabies Challenge Fund.  Below is Angel’s side of their communication. Kris’s beloved dog Meadow also had a mast cell cancer develop directly on the site of his rabies shot 3 months after it was administered, and he died after it metastasized. The Rabies Challenge Fund is a nonprofit group working to prove that the rabies vaccine gives immunity for at least seven years, thus limiting the number of shots a dog has to get.  The Fund relies exclusively on donations from pet lovers. Please give if you can.


Angel Moran, writing Sunday, August 30, 2009

Dear Kris: My chihuahua was recently diagnosed with fibrosarcoma. It is at the presumed injection site of her rabies shot. The vet said there is no correlation to her cancer and the injection site but from what I am reading I don’t believe what I am being told. Any studies you have would be greatly appreciated. She developed the lump within 3 months of her booster shot. Read more »

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Dry Dog Food: Safely Handling and Storing Kibble

Written by Jan on July 29, 2009 – 12:01 am

j0314409Do you feed your dog or cat dry commercial pet food?  Do you know that there are special ways to handle and store it?  Here’s some excellent advice Chelsea of Hero’s Pets sent me. 

First, keep in mind that your animal companion’s food is just as perishable as your own.

After you purchase your food it is important to remember that, like a loaf of bread, just because it comes in a bag and has an expiration day a year or so long, doesn’t mean it lasts on your home shelf for that long. The expiration is how long the food is good for BEFORE it is opened, while it is still in an oxygen barrier bag. As soon as you open the bag it is exposed to oxygen and begins to degrade. Read more »

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Dog Food: 10 Scary Truths

Written by Jan on July 14, 2009 – 12:01 am

Dog with food bowl 40% of dogs are obese. 46% of dogs and 39% of cats now die of cancer. Heart, kidney and liver disease are epidemic. Like people, dogs are what they eat. Save your dog a lot of suffering, and save yourself a fortune in vet bills, by learning the truth about your dog’s diet. Here are 10 important things you may not know about what your dog is eating:

1)      Commercial dog food is “fast food.

Heavily-processed fast foods (burgers, fries, tacos, etc.) as a big diet component can cause major health problems in people. How can fast foods be good for dogs? Only dog food manufacturers think this nonsense makes sense. Dogs and people share roughly 75% the same genetic makeup, and we have similar nutritional needs. What we’re doing to our own health with processed foods, we’re also doing to our dogs. And it’s happening faster.

2)      People food is good for dogs.

Despite what you’ve heard from friends, vets and pet food manufacturers, wholesome “people food” is good for dogs.  People food is only bad for dog food makers. The same fresh, nutritious foods people eat can offer your dog the nutrition he needs and save you a mountain of vet bills.  It just takes a little education to learn the small differences between human and canine nutritional needs. (Hint: no onions, grapes or raisins. Rinse off rich spices and sauces. Go easy on carbs and avoid wheat and corn.)

3)      Don’t presume the food your vet sells is a superior product.

Veterinarians, like medical doctors, learn relatively little about nutrition in school. Much of what they do learn comes directly from pet food company vets, sales reps, articles, studies, and seminars. Read more »

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Vaccinating A Stray Dog: Which Shots and When?

Written by Jan on July 7, 2009 – 12:01 am

Lucky Abbey strayed into the right new home
Lucky Abbey strayed into the right home

 Question e-mailed to me:

“We found a stray dog and so we have no idea what her vaccination history is or even if she has been spayed. She is probably about a year old at the most…looks like a small yellow lab.

I want to just have her vaccinated for parvo and distemper only and of course we have to have her vaccinated for rabies. But my question for you is how long to wait between the spaying and the vaccinations? And how long between before she gets her rabies shot? And which order do you recommend having all of this done? I know I have seen this information somewhere on the Internet before but it was a long time ago and I just can’t seem to find it now.

I would really appreciate any advice. At this point I don’t even know which thing should be done first, the spaying or the vaccinations.

Note: I got this question from Kat after she watched one of our K9Author YouTube Videos on vaccinating dogs.

Response: Hi Kat.  I’m no fan of the rabies vaccine because of its many adverse reactions. Neither do I like the idea of vaccinating a stressed dog; the vaccine may not “take” and the chance of side effects increases.

However … because most people wouldn’t be comfortable handling a strange dog with no shot history, I’d either have a titer test done to test immunity for rabies (which would prove immunity and not harm the dog, but would cost $150 or so and not allow you to get a license) … or I’d vaccinate.  If you do vaccinate, wait 3 or more weeks before spaying (or neutering) or giving another shot. If you can have a holistic vet or homeopathic vet give the shot, that would be great.  A homeopathic remedy given with the rabies shot can help prevent a reaction.

I would never vaccinate against anything else at the same time as the rabies shot. Read more »

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Is Your Dog Stressed Out?: Locate and Eliminate Hidden Stressors

Written by Jan on July 7, 2009 – 12:01 am

Ostressedur pets’ lives are too often filled with hidden stresses that challenge their health and longevity.  In addition to common stressors like highly processed commercial food, over-vaccination and over-medication, pets will be healthier and happier if you: 
•  Reduce their isolation.  Dogs are pack animals. Leave them alone hour after hour, day after day, and they will mourn their very existence.  This can result in  problems like separation anxiety, incessant barking and destructive behavior, and also in health problems. In fact, insufficient attention may be the biggest stress of all.  

•  Improve water.   Impure or insufficient water is dangerous.   Make sure you take water along with you on long or hot walks. Never let your dog drink sprinkler run-off or out of fountains (which likely contain toxic chemicals).  And if you’re drinking purified water, your pets should be, too. 

•  Get Your Dog Moving.  A fit dog is less prone to injury and has a healthier digestive system and heart.  Did you know that heart disease is a major killer of dogs? Like us, they need sensible exercise to live a long, healthy life. But take it easy. Dogs will do their best to keep up with joggers and cyclists even when they shouldn’t. Don’t ask them to exert themselves strenuously unless they’re in shape.

•  Stay slim.  Chubby dogs aren’t cute. They are health problems waiting to happen. Expect early onset of joint damage, diabetes and major organ disease. Read more »

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