Vaccination Reactions Can Mimic Disease Symptoms

Written by Jan on October 2, 2011 – 1:00 am

Chronic and acute disease in dogs can be caused by the very vaccines given to prevent disease. Read what homeopathic veterinarian Dr. Michael Dym has to say. 
 
Vaccination is often thought of by the conventional veterinary community as a benign procedure intended to prevent acute diseases, with side effects occurring only rarely. However, vaccination in certain sensitive individuals can result in a chronic disease state that is long lasting or even fatal.  
 
Vaccine-induced disease, called “vaccinosis,” is understood as the disturbance of the life force or chi of the patient that may result in mental, emotional and physical changes. These are induced by laboratory modification of a virus or bacterium to make a vaccine. Then, instead of seeing acute expressions of disease, we are seeing symptoms of chronic illness over years or even a lifetime.
 
For example, symptoms of acute distemper virus infection in dogs include eye and nose discharge; conjunctivitis; vomiting, diarrhea and loss of appetite; watery feces with blood, mucous and often a foul odor; spasms or seizures and paralysis; eruptions around the mouth; swelling of feet often with red foot pads; pneumonia; skin eruptions; and in chronic cases, emaciation.  
 
What I have seen in my many years of private practice is that distemper and other vaccines administered to prevent acute illness can contribute to symptoms seen in chronic disease and pathologies. Some symptoms often seen in chronic canine illness include chronic runny eyes and conjunctivitis (tear stains in dogs, dry eye, chronic eye allergies); chronic vomiting, diarrhea, appetite issues; emaciation; pancreatitis, inflammatory bowel disease, GI lymphoma;  chronic spasms and seizures (epilepsy, brain tumors); skin eruptions and swelling of feet and red feet pads; itching from lifelong skin allergies; and eruptions around the mouth (seen in lip fold dermatitis).  That is, adverse reactions from vaccination may mimic symptoms of the very disease the vaccine was meant to prevent.  Reactions may occur immediately or months or even years later.
 
Symptoms of acute rabies infection include restlessness, viciousness, avoidance of company, unusual affection, desire to travel, and inability to be restrained. Other symptoms are self biting; strange cries and howls; inability to swallow resulting in gagging when eating and drinking; staring eyes; swallowing wood, stones and other inedibles; destruction of blankets, clothing, etc.; convulsive seizures; throat spasms; increased sexual desire; disturbed heart function; or excited and jerky breathing.
 
My biggest concern with pets are behavior changes presenting after vaccination with either the distemper or rabies vaccine. This is usually along the lines of aggression, suspicion, unusual fears, etc. The essential aspect in rabies vaccinosis is loss of impulse control. (Read more from Dr. Dym about reactions seen after the rabies vaccine.)
 
Many pets may exhibit behaviors such as “reverse sneezing” and increased mounting by neutered pets. Conventional medicine does not explain these odd symptoms, but homeopathically these pets may be exhibiting symptoms of rabies vaccinosis.  In my opinion, they are fairly common.
 
Other vaccines may also contribute in their own way to chronic illness in our pets.  Bordatella (kennel cough) vaccination can lead to chronic coughing (diagnosed as collapsing trachea, COPD, or possibly eventual heart disease). Leptospirosis vaccination often leads to chronic liver or kidney disease down the road, as well as chronic skin allergies. You certainly need to follow the law with regards to rabies vaccination, however, most other vaccinations are optional,  particularly in adult pets vaccinated as puppies.
 
A homeopathic remedy given at the time of some immunizations can help reduce adverse reactions. Seek out a veterinarian trained in homeopathy. If your pet is suffering from cancer or another acute or chronic disease, know that more and more states and localities will allow an exemption to rabies vaccination.  We hope that states will soon allow a rabies antibody titer blood test instead of vaccination. (Please see the nonprofit study of the rabies vaccine by the Rabies Challenge Fund).
 
If your pet is suffering from the above chronic disease symptoms, especially in the days to months following a vaccination, he/she should be evaluated by a homeopathic veterinarian to try to cure this disease state over time.  Important note: Vaccine labels state that vaccines are to be administered to “healthy pets only.”
———————————- 
To learn more about Dr Dym, see his website at www.canineworld.com/drdym To schedule a homeopathic phone consultation, please phone 856-577-8064 or 609-413-2194. You can also e-mail Dr Dym for a homeopathic or holistic consultation.
 
Post your dog’s rabies reaction and read other readers’ stories here: The Rabies Vaccine and Your Dog: Side Effects   

Get Our Vaccination DVD
:  World-renowned scientists W. Jean Dodds, DVM and Ronald D. Schultz, PhD spoke at our Safer Pet Vaccination Benefit Seminar in March 2010. A DVD of the event, along with articles by the speakers, is available here.  Or learn more about it at http://www.dogs4dogs.com/saferpet.  Click these links to learn more about rabies vaccination and about canine vaccination in general and read articles elsewhere on this blog. 
Share
Tags: distemper, dog, dog shots, homeopathy, puppy shots, rabies, reactions, side effects, symptoms, Vaccination, vaccine
Posted under Uncategorized, Vaccination, Vaccine Reactions | 3 Comments » | Email This Post

Combination Shots for Dogs: Weapons of Over-Vaccination

Written by Jan on September 9, 2009 – 11:04 am

comboshotWhombo combos, mumbo jumbos: that’s what veterinarians who understand immunology call combination shots. Unlike a vaccine such as rabies, which contains a single virus, combination vaccines contain multiple “modified live” viruses mixed with various bacteria. Think of them as toxic soups, biochemical wolves in sheep’s clothing. When your vet sends out reminders to bring your dog “up to date on shots,” expect the whombo combo. Beware the wolf.

You’ve probably seen combo shots listed on your vet bill as DHLPP, DHLPPC, DA2LPPC, 5-Way, 6-Way, 7-Way, 7 in 1 or the like.  After you learn more about them, you won’t want to see them on a bill again. Read more »

Share
Tags: combination, combo shots, DHLPPC, DHPP, distemper, dog, Leptospirosis, parvovirus, puppy shot schedules, reactions, shots, vaccinating a puppy, Vaccination, vaccines
Posted under Preventing Vaccine Reactions, Uncategorized, Vaccination | 97 Comments » | Email This Post

Vaccinating Dogs: 10 Steps to Eliminating Unnecessary Shots

Written by Jan on April 22, 2009 – 9:11 am

Syringes with blood dropWhen vaccinating our dogs, most of us rely on our vets, trusting that their advice is up-to-date and not biased by economic or political concerns.  Unfortunately,  unless vets stay current on veterinary journal reading (no easy task) … and actually assimilate new findings … and decide to forgo significant vaccination income, their advice may lag well behind many years behind what experts now advocate.

Vaccination is a serious medical procedure with the potential for adversely affecting health, both in the short and long term. Experts now advise us to vaccinate each dog according to his or her individual needs.  But  how do you cut back without endangering your dog’s health?  Here are 10 ways to eliminate unnecessary shots while actually improving pet health.

1. Always consider locale, lifestyle, risk and vaccine effectiveness. Bordetella (kennel cough) is for dogs in poorly-ventilated close quarters (like kennels), not for pets sometimes playing with others. Leptospirosis is a disease of wetlands and woodlands, and the vaccine may not protect against the actual disease in your area. Lyme is only for dogs in areas with Lyme disease. Furthermore, each of these vaccines has dangerous side effects and their efficacy is questionable. Don’t give them without proven need and benefit.

2. Eliminate vaccines on the “not recommended” list of the American Hospital Association’s Canine Vaccine Task Force as well as most veterinary organizations and schools. These include Giardia and Coronavirus (found in many combination shots).

3. Say no! to combination shots. Combo shots (called names like DHLPPC) assault your dog’s immune system with five or seven vaccines at once. Given for (false) economy and convenience rather than health or safety, combination shots are linked to autoimmune disease and other major health problems. Also, they invariably contain unnecessary and even dangerous vaccines.

4. Stop vaccinating against diseases for which your dog may already have immunity. Read more »

Share
Tags: adverse reactions, bad reactions, distemper, dog, dogs, kennel cough, parvovirus, rabies shot, rabies vaccine, shots, side effects, titer testing, vaccinate, vaccinating, Vaccination, vaccine, vet, veterinarian
Posted under Uncategorized, Vaccination | 167 Comments » | Email This Post

Titer Test: Don’t Vaccinate Your Dog Unnecessarily

Written by Jan on October 22, 2008 – 4:29 pm

Titer Testing: a Simple Blood Test

Titer Testing: a Simple Blood Test

Enlightened veterinarians and pet parents have become increasingly wary of the health risks, and lack of benefits, associated with repeatedly vaccinating dogs after their initial “puppy shots.” Is titer testing the solution to the over-vaccination problem? Here’s a crash course to help you muddle through the mire of misinformation surrounding this simple blood test, and to help you decide whether or not to test your dog’s antibody titers.

What is titer testing?A titer test (pronounced TIGHT er) is a laboratory test measuring the existence and level of antibodies to disease in blood. Antibodies are produced when an antigen (like a virus or bacteria) provokes a response from the immune system. This response can come from natural exposure or from vaccination. (Note: titering is also called serum vaccine antibody titering and serologic vaccine titering.)

How is the test performed? Your test result will have an explanation of what your pet’s test result means. But if you want to know more, here’s the test in a nutshell: First, one mL of blood is drawn. The sample is then diluted. Titer levels, expressed as ratios, indicate how many times blood can be diluted before no antibodies are detected. If blood can be diluted a 1000 times and still show antibodies, the ratio would be 1:1000. This is a “strong” titer. A titer of 1:2 would be weak.

Should I test for all diseases?The most recommended test examines antibodies for both parvovirus and distemper, the two most important viruses.Rabies titers are also often tested. Usually, for most dogs, tests for other diseases are generally not considered useful or necessary.

Why test? The parvovirus/distemper test can help you or others (vets, groomers, kennel owners, etc.) determine if your dog requires additional vaccination, and may save your dog unnecessary shots. It is especially useful when making a decision about vaccinating an animal with unknown vaccination history, or for determining if puppies have received immunity from vaccination (more below).

Most experts believe strong titers are a more reliable indication of immunity than vaccination: tests show the actual immune response, not just the attempt to cause an immune response by vaccination. Do not expect, however, that everyone will accept test results in place of proof of vaccination.The subject of immunity is complicated, and we are programmed to think of vaccination as “the gold standard” — the more, the better. Experts who challenge the status quo are often maligned. Humans don’t like change.

How often should I test titers for parvo and distemper? Read more »

Share
Tags: antibody, blood, distemper, dog, immunity test, parvovirus, puppy shots, rabies, serology, titer, titer test, vaccinate, vaccine
Posted under Titer Testing, Uncategorized, Vaccination | 72 Comments » | Email This Post