New Book on Nutrition by Veterinarian W. Jean Dodds!

Written by Jan on February 6, 2015 – 10:42 am

 

PLEASE CROSSPOST

My good friend, veterinarian W. Jean Dodds, and Diana Laverdure, have written a new book called Canine Nutrigenomics: The New Science of Feeding Your Dog for Optimum Health. Dr. Dodds, as most of you know, is a world-famous expert in vaccination, hematology, titer testing, canine thyroid disease and more.  She is also co-founder of the amazing Rabies Challenge Fund study of the rabies vaccine. I interviewed Dr. Dodds at length for my own book Scared Poopless: The Straight Scoop on Dog Care and together we have twice fought dangerous legislation affecting California dogs.

I’ve ordered her book and can’t wait to read it. If you click Canine Nutrigenomics: The New Science of Feeding Your Dog for Optimum Health to buy the book, I’ll earn a very small commission that I will donate to the Rabies Challenge Fund. Otherwise, find Canine Nutrigenomics on Amazon.com or Dogwise.com.

Here’s a portion of the Dogwise press release.

Secrets to Feeding Dogs for Optimum Cellular Health and

Longevity Revealed in Groundbreaking New Book

Vibrant health begins in the cells. Learn how to transform your dog’s cellular health with the power of nutrigenomics in this ground-breaking new book. Nutrigenomics (a combination of the nutrition and genome) is the study of how the foods we and our pets eat “speak” to our cells to regulate gene expression, which in turn plays a huge role in determining whether a person or animal will live a life of vibrant health, or one plagued by illness. Read more »

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Spaying and Neutering: New Warnings About Health Problems

Written by Jan on February 3, 2015 – 10:42 pm

 

Cute little husky puppy isolated on white background Veterinarian Patricia Jordan sent me an excellent article recently that summarizes the new thinking on the negative medical consequences of spaying and neutering dogs, especially when surgery is performed on immature dogs.  This article, written by H.B. Turner, posted with her permission, and previously posted on her blog, is from her ‘Healthful Dog’ magazine www.healthfuldog.co.uk

Though restricting indiscriminate breeding is vital to curb overpopulation of pets, we must learn to spay or neuter, whenever possible, when it won’t harm the dog’s health. As with many medical procedures, the risks must be weighed against the many benefits of sterilization. Talk with your veterinarian and decide what to do.

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The Spay/Neuter Health Denigration

Sterilization will naturally serve to prevent any unwanted litters. In bitches, spaying will greatly reduce the risk of breast cancer, pyometra, perianal fistula and cancers of the reproductive organs.5

Spay surgery itself carries a somewhat high rate (around 20%) of complications such as infection, haemorrhage and even death.5

Spaying significantly increases the rate of urinary incontinence in bitches….about 20-30% of all spayed bitches will eventually develop this problem. This is believed to be most likely caused by the lack of estrogen that results from being spayed.1

Sterilization of males may reduce some unwanted sexual behaviours, but there are few other proven benefits to neutering a male dog. Testicular cancer is prevented, but the actual risk of that cancer is extremely low (0.1%) among intact dogs. Contrary to popular belief, studies show that the risk of prostate cancer is actually HIGHER in neutered dogs than in their intact counterparts.5

Several studies prove significant health risks associated with sterilization, particularly when done at an early age. The most problematic is a delayed closure of the bony growth plates. This results in an abnormal, skeletal development that increases the incidence of orthopaedic problems like hip dysplasia and patellar luxation. Working and performance dogs, if neutered before maturity, risk the inability to perform the jobs they were bred for.10 Read more »

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Don’t Let Your Vet Vaccinate Blindly: Test Titers

Written by Jan on January 26, 2015 – 11:59 pm

Someone (I’ll call her Ann) wrote me last week asking: Is there any recent info I can pass along to my Vet – he says titres are not reliable and he will not do them.

Yikes. He-will-not-do-them? Titer testing — a simple blood draw to test immunity to a disease — is an absolutely safe procedure. You can test titers (antibody) levels to determine if an animal (or human) already has immunity to particular diseases and doesn’t need “boosters.”  The most commonly tested titers are for parvovirus and distemper, the two most important diseases, and also rabies in certain instances. Don’t waste your money on anything else.

Even if Ann’s vet thinks titer testing is unreliable and a waste of time and money, it is her money and her responsibility to keep her dog healthy. Not his. His job, in this instance, is to draw blood and offer advice if asked. After testing, it is up to Ann to determine the weight to give to the results. She can then allow her vet to vaccinate if he wants. Or not.

Incidentally, Ann could have any vet or vet tech draw blood. She could send the blood sample to a lab (like my favorite, hemopet.org). They’ll perform the test and an expert will interpret the results. From that point on, she can solicit her vet’s input. Or not.

Although most enlightened veterinarians will happily test titers, too many, like Ann’s vet, refuse to test or will belittle results. Others avoid confrontation by charging astronomical rates. A parvovirus/distemper titer test should cost around $50-60; a rabies titer (not for export) should cost around $100. Add to this, around $25 for a blood draw; some tests in some locations may also require a shipping expense. If your vet is charging much more than that, he/she is just trying to discourage (and/or take advantage of) you.

But isn’t vaccinating cheaper than testing? 

Read more »

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Dog Vaccine Reactions: Reality or Coincidence?

Written by Jan on January 14, 2015 – 5:00 am

Vaccine reactions

 

Every day someone writes to me with another horror story about their dog experiencing a seizure or a behavior change, developing autoimmune disease, or even dying after vaccination. Unless the reaction was immediate, but sometimes even then, their veterinarian likely insisted that vaccines are safe and couldn’t have caused the problem. But the pet’s guardian knows better. The dog was healthy until …. He had never had a seizure before …. He went downhill quickly after …. Often, veterinarians suggest that the dog had the health problem all along; vaccination just brought it to the forefront. Here’s the question: Without the vaccine, would it ever have materialized? Here’s a recent comment on my post, Rabies Vaccine: Side Effects and Help

I just had to put my puppy down yesterday [after rabies vaccination]. They told us that it could have been liver shunts, brain tumor, distemper and blah blah blah. They tried to cover for themselves. She did not show any signs of anything before her rabies shot. She was having an adverse reaction to the shot from the beginning. Hives, swelling, pustules, all of which lead into seizures once a day, then twice a day, then four times. We then took her to an animal hospital which said well it could have been a reaction but they didn’t rule anything else out either. We spent thousands of dollars to find out ANYTHING…nothing came up.

I wish I could say that this post was unusual, but it’s not. Since 2004, when my dog Jiggy was diagnosed with autoimmune liver disease after injection with the rabies vaccine, I have been researching and writing extensively about vaccination — particularly about preventing over-vaccination and adverse reactions. The one big difference since then is that more people suspect reactions than they used to. That’s progress of sorts, I guess, although I’ve been hoping for more. I’ve particularly been hoping that veterinarians would have started owning up to the dangers of vaccination. Most haven’t.

Why? Here’s an excerpt from my free 14-page report on rabies vaccination. Read more »

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Free Eye Exams for Service Dogs

Written by Jan on January 12, 2015 – 10:37 am

eye-exam

American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists (ACVO) is gearing up for the 8th Annual ACVO/StokesRx National Service Animal Eye Exam Event. The goal of this event is to provide as many free screening exams as possible to eligible service animals across the U.S. and Canada throughout the month of May. Read more »

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